Cut Resistant Gloves: Levels of Cut Resistance Explained

Cut Resistant Gloves: Levels of Cut Resistance Explained

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Originally Posted On: https://www.upsidedownsupply.com/blog/cut-resistant-gloves-levels-of-cut-resistance-explained.html

 

Did you know that 1/3 of all injuries that occur at work are hand injuries? It’s true! And last year, over one million hospital visits due to hand injuries could have been avoided if the industrial and medical workers had used appropriate safety gloves.

With statistics that high, it makes sense to invest in hand protection for all of your workers. Providing the right level of cut resistant gloves will keep your employees safe, reduce time off work for injuries, and ensure your operations are meeting industry safety standards. PPE is highly recommended, and often required, for all heavy-duty environments, including construction PPE.

Here we unpack the levels of cut resistance and how to choose which gloves are best for your workers.

Why Make Use Of Cut Level Standards?

The new revised ANSI/ISEA 105 ratings give users a more accurate insight into the cut resistance levels available to them. A Tomodynamometer (TDM100) is used to perform the cut test and determine the cut resistance of protective gloves, and it is more sensitive and can provide more information about puncture and abrasion resistance. As a result of this information, the new standards not only use numbers, but they also communicate additional information through the use of alphabetical characters.

New ANSI Cut Level Ratings and Applications

Cut-resistant glove levels are a way to categorize the toughness of the fabric. Three main areas are tested: the ability to withstand contact with heat, chemicals, and blades. Ideally, gloves should offer enough protection for the application, but also allow enough flexibility for the dextrous movement of fingers.

Each work environment has specific cut hazards and will need work gloves that offer a particular level of protection. Here are some guidelines to help you determine what is right for different sections of your business.

ANSI Cut Level A1: Light Cut Hazards 200 – 499 grams

  • assembly
  • construction
  • general-purpose
  • maintenance
  • material handling
  • packaging
  • warehouse

ANSI Cut Level A2: Light/Medium Cut Hazards 500 – 999 grams

  • appliance manufacturing
  • assembly
  • construction
  • general-purpose
  • maintenance
  • material handling
  • metal handling
  • packaging
  • warehouse

ANSI Cut Level A3: Light/Medium Cut Hazards 1000 – 1499 grams

  • appliance manufacturing
  • assembly
  • construction
  • general-purpose
  • maintenance
  • material handling
  • metal handling
  • packaging
  • warehouse

ANSI Cut Level A4: Medium Cut Hazards 1500 – 2199 grams

  • appliance manufacturing
  • automotive assembly
  • bottle and light glass handling
  • canning
  • carpet installation
  • drywalling
  • electrical
  • HVAC
  • metal handling
  • metal stamping
  • packaging
  • paper production
  • warehouse

ANSI Cut Level A5: Medium Cut Hazards 2200 – 2999 grams

  • appliance manufacturing
  • automotive assembly
  • bottle and light glass handling
  • canning
  • carpet installation
  • drywalling
  • electrical
  • HVAC
  • metal handling
  • metal stamping
  • packaging
  • paper production
  • warehouse

ANSI Cut Level A6: Medium/Heavy Cut Hazards 3000 – 3999 grams

  • appliance manufacturing
  • automotive assembly
  • bottle and light glass handling
  • canning
  • carpet installation
  • drywalling
  • electrical
  • HVAC
  • metal handling
  • metal stamping
  • packaging
  • paper production
  • warehouse

ANSI Cut Level A7: Medium/Heavy Cut Hazards 4000 – 4999 grams

  • appliance manufacturing
  • automotive assembly
  • bottle and light glass handling
  • canning
  • carpet installation
  • drywalling
  • electrical
  • HVAC
  • meat processing
  • metal handling
  • metal stamping
  • packaging
  • paper production
  • warehouse

ANSI Cut Level A8: Heavy Cut Hazards 5000 – 5999 grams

  • appliance manufacturing
  • automotive assembly
  • bottle and light glass handling
  • canning
  • carpet installation
  • drywalling
  • electrical
  • HVAC
  • meat processing
  • metal handling
  • metal stamping
  • packaging
  • paper production
  • warehouse

ANSI Cut Level A9: Heavy Cut Hazards 6000+ grams

  • appliance manufacturing
  • automotive assembly
  • bottle and light glass handling
  • canning
  • carpet installation
  • drywalling
  • electrical
  • HVAC
  • meat processing
  • metal handling
  • metal stamping
  • packaging
  • paper production
  • warehouse

EN388 Glove Ratings

EN388 ratings are a European standard. They supply more information to do with resistance to types of hazards that might occur on the job. Each rating grade consists of digits that relate to the level of:

  • Abrasion resistance
  • Blade cut resistance
  • Tear resistance
  • Puncture resistance
  • TDM Test
  • Impact Test

Upside Down Supply gloves for contractors usually display both the ANSI and EN388 ratings.

TDM 100 Machine Cut Test Ratings

The TDM (Tomodynamometer) machine for cut testing, AKA the TDM 100, is designed to test protective gloves for cut resistance. Designed to test resistance to cutting by sharp edges, such as bladed tools, glass, sheet metal, and knives. The machine determines the level of cut resistance of protective materials and clothing. The ratings given are as follows:

A – 204 – 508 grams/2 – 4.9 newtons: Small parts assembly without sharp edges, light material handling

B – 509 – 1,019 grams/5 – 9.9 newtons: Packaging, light-duty general purpose, warehouse

C – 1,020 – 1,529 grams/10 – 14.9 newtons: HVAC, light-duty metal handling, plastics, metal stamping, light duty glass handling, material handling

D – 1,530 – 2,242 grams/15 – 21 newtons: HVAC, light-duty metal handling, bottle and light glass handling, appliance manufacturing, canning, carpet installation, drywalling, electrical

E – 2,243 – 3,058 grams/22 – 29.9 newtons: Sheet metal handling, metal stamping, glass handling, automotive assembly

F – 3,059+ grams/30+ newtons: Heavy-duty metal stamping, food processing, metal recycling, pulp and paper

OSHA Compliance

As a business owner, you have to comply with OSHA regulation 1910.132(h)(1). This means ensuring that your employees are protected with PPE at all times when they are on the job. Aside from keeping your workers safe on the job, providing workers with PPE hand protection, will save you from having to pay non-compliance penalties, and additional workers compensation fees.

Types of Cut Resistant Gloves

Cut resistant gloves are available for many different uses and applications. Getting the wrong gloves for a particular working environment can be just as hazardous as not wearing gloves.

Cut Resistance and Palm Coatings

Palm coatings offer different levels of hand protection while keeping task-specific functionality. As you’re choosing cut resistant gloves according to the safety rating, take the palm coating into consideration as well.

Here are the most common palm coatings and what conditions they’re most suited for.

Polyurethane (PU)

If you are looking for gloves that offer grip in oily, wet, and dry conditions, opt for polyurethane palm coatings. Polyurethane palm covers are semi-smooth and extremely flexible, making them easy to grip and manipulate things during use. A polyurethane palm coating gives you a glove that is breathable and is also abrasion-resistant and porous.

A PU coating will penetrate to the inside of the glove, which can lead to sweating and a heat build-up. PU isn’t as hard-wearing as nitrile or latex and is better suited to light jobs such as inspection, small parts handling, and fine detail assembly.

Nitrile

Another option for oily, wet, and dry conditions, are nitrile palm covers. High water permeability gives nitrile the ability to absorb liquids quickly which gives it a good grip in wet environments.

Smooth Nitrile

Smooth nitrile flat gloves are made of synthetic rubber and are latex-free. They don’t have any texture on the surface and are abrasion, snag, and perforation resistant. They offer flexible grip and excellent tactile sensitivity. Smooth nitrile has a high-abrasion resistance, though it is less flexible, non-breathable, and non-porous.

Foam Nitrile

Foam nitrile offers an excellent grip under wet, oily, and dry applications. Microtexture is common on nitrile gloves, which makes them suitable for holding small parts or tools under all conditions. Even though foam nitrile offers less abrasion resistance than the flat nitrile coating. It is a thin, tacky layer that is long-lasting and hard-wearing with excellent snag, abrasion, and perforation resistance. Due to being porous and flexible, foam nitrile channels water and oil away from the surface. Foam nitrile is porous, flexible, and breathable. Comprised of synthetic rubber, foam nitrile contain no latex or natural rubber proteins.

Sandy Foam Nitrile

Sandy Foam Nitrile has a micro roughened texture finish. This sand-like finish improves grip and increases abrasion resistance. As with the other nitrile gloves, they are made from synthetic rubber with no latex or natural rubber proteins.

Latex

If you’re looking for an economical coating, that is flexible and has good tensile strength, choose latex. Latex gloves won’t lose their shape and retain elasticity over time. While latex is non-porous, it is comfortable to wear. Latex shouldn’t be used in oily applications and is sensitive to heat. Some people are allergic to latex.

Foam Latex

Foam latex has a micro-texture that improves breathability and comfort. These gloves offer excellent flexibility and are highly resistant to cuts and tears. They are good for wet or dry applications.

Sandy Foam Latex

Sandy foam latex is similar to foam latex, but the texture is micro roughened for excellent breathability and resistance to cuts and tears.

Crinkle Latex

Crinkle latex has a rough texture for excellent grip and abrasion while retaining the qualities of the other latex gloves. They are also made from natural rubber.

Sourcing and Selecting the Right Cut Resistant Gloves

The right pair of cut resistant gloves can prevent serious injury and work downtime. With the rise of new technology, there is a wide variety of cut resistant gloves to choose from. Cut resistant gloves can now also offer other benefits such as warmth or impact resistance – and some are even touchscreen compatible!

Navigating through all the different options to find the perfect solution for your workers can be challenging. Understanding the cut resistance levels makes it easier to choose the right protective gear. If you need any safety glove help or advice, give us a call at 800-776-7613.

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