7 Things You Can Do to Enhance Your Chances of Surviving a Plane

7 Things You Can Do to Enhance Your Chances of Surviving a Plane Crash

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What if it’s not turbulence?

After your flight takes off, you sit back in your seat and begin enjoying the view. When suddenly, the plane starts shaking.

Soon, the pilot comes over the intercom with bad news. “Ladies and gentlemen, please brace yourselves for a crash landing.” What do you do? The truth is, there’s not a whole lot you can do.

Surviving a plane crash largely depends on the decisions you make before your flight takes off. Knowing what to wear, and where to sit, can make the difference between life and death.

Are you getting ready to fly, and want to make sure you arrive safely? Read on to find out what you can do to keep yourself safe as an airline passenger.

1. Outfits for Surviving a Plane Crash

First, we’d like to start by saying you don’t have to stress yourself out with worry. The chances of you’re plane crashing are pretty low, about 1 in 12 million. We find that the more you know about flight safety, the more enjoyable you’re traveling experience can be.

Wear Tight Clothes

The outfit you wear plays a key role in surviving a plane crash. It’s a good idea to wear clothes that fit tightly. If you’re plane encounters any problems, you won’t have to worry about your loose clothing slowing you down.

Protect Your Skin

Another advantage of tight-fitting clothing is the ability to protect you from sharp objects or fire. A shirt with sleeves, and jeans that cover your entire legs, will reduce the amount of exposed skin you have.

Wear clothes made completely from natural materials. Synthetic clothing is infamous for catching fire easily. Instead, wear clothes made out of cotton or wool, since they are more difficult to burn.

Practical Escape Shoes

Make sure that the shoes you’re wearing are practical and easy to move around in. The idea here is to have shoes that are not going to fall off your feet.

Whether you crash on land, or in water, you’ll have to make your way through the wreckage to escape. Sturdy boots and well-made sneakers are much better for escaping than high heels or business shoes.

2. Pick the Right Seat

Instead of sitting in the very front, we suggest you choose a seat in the back of the plane. If you can, try to get a middle seat in the back of the plane.

The middle seats in the back of the plane will help insulate you. The front of the airplane will be able to absorb the majority of the crash. Your middle seat will also help prevent you from smashing into the walls of the plane.

Whenever possible, we suggest finding a middle seat that’s also close to one of the exits. The faster you can exit the plane after a crash, the higher your chances of survival are.

3. Listen to Safety Instructions

An Aviation Crash Attorney would argue that pre-flight safety speeches are always important. Even though you may fly a lot, chances are you’ve never been in a plane crash before. The moment you’re in a plane crash, everything you thought you knew is likely to go out the window.

Instead, you’ll be facing intense emotions, as you struggle to remember the best course of action. The pre-flight speech is a great way to prepare your mind and cement the safety information into place.

4. Each Plane Is Different

You can’t assume you already know the best way to handle a crash for the exact plane model you’re on. The airplane you’re on could have different escape route instructions than the last plane you were a passenger on.

Play it safe by tuning in to the pre-flight speech as well as reading the safety card.

Study Safety Cards

Every airline is different, however, it is common for safety cards to be in the seat in front of you. Look in the back pocket of the seat in front of you, pull out the safety card, and review it before you take off.

5. Study Exit Door

If you find yourself sitting in an exit row, take a moment to look at the exit door. Study the door, and take in all of the details. Do you feel confident that you know how to open it?

If you’re in a plane crash, the flight attendant will be the first one to open the door. However, if the flight attendant sustains an injury, or dies, it’ll be up to you to open the door for everyone else.

If you don’t feel that you can open the door for whatever reason, let the flight attendant know immediately so you can switch your seat.

6. Count Number of Seats

Next, if you’re not in the exit row, find out how many rows are between you and the exit row. Start by counting the number of seats between you and the closest exit row.

When the plane crashes, it might be difficult to know where you are. However, if you count the number of chairs between you and the nearest exit row, you can begin navigating your way off of the plane using the seats.

Finally, make sure that any of your carry-on items are completely out of your way.

7. Use Carry on Items as Pads

Clear aisles are important when you’re working to escape after a plane crash. However, clear aisles aren’t the only reason you should be storing your carry on items by your feet.

During the plane crash, the impact could force your legs under the seat, breaking your feet and possibly your legs. A small carry-on item under your seat serves as padding for your shins if they do fly forward during a crash. Nobody wants to break their feet or legs, but it’s especially important to be intact when you’re trying to escape a burning airplane.

Have a Great Flight

Now you know what you can do to increase your odds of surviving a plane crash. We hope that our article will help you find at least one way to protect yourself the next time you fly.

Whether you’re flying for business or pleasure, it’s always a good idea to be up to date on the latest safety tips. For more ways to stay safe, explore the rest of this site.

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